Sep 25, 2012

Future Batteries May Be Powered By Sugar: Japanese Scientists Developed More Efficient Batteries Using Sucrose [News]

According to a report published by the website DigInfo, a group of researchers from the University o...


Future-Batteries-May-Be-Powered-By-Sugar-Japanese-Scientists-Developed-More-Efficient-Batteries-Using-Sucrose-[News]According to a report published by the website DigInfo, a group of researchers from the University of Tokyo, Japan, discovered a way to use sugar to develop rechargeable batteries in a more efficient and cheaper way, which would make it possible in future to replace Device such as Lithium Ion used nowadays. According to the research, lithium - widely used in batteries for digital cameras, cell phones and other electronics - is not abundantly found throughout the world, forcing many countries to import this substance. Thus, motivated in finding a viable alternative to develop new rechargeable devices, researchers used sucrose as an active principle to act as anode (means negative pole of an electronic junction) of the batteries.

Future-Batteries-May-Be-Powered-By-Sugar-Japanese-Scientists-Developed-More-Efficient-Batteries-Using-Sucrose-[News]

Scientists heated sugar to 1,500°C in an oxygen-free furnace, transforming the compound into a carbon powder. And although other elements also may be heated to obtain such powders, sucrose is extremely abundant, which may influence the manufacturing process of new batteries, reflecting also the final production cost of electronics.

The research is still an augmented reality and still has a long way to go for making it possible in real life. But we would surely like to keep and eye over the research for future development. Replacing Lithium Ion with Hard Carbon based batteries may as well radically change the production cost of batteries making it real cheap in future.

[Via]

2 comments :

  1. Wait, so I'm not going to charge my electronics with sugar. I'll have to keep plugging the outlet, not throwing sugar on drums. '-'

    ReplyDelete
  2. There goes the cane plantation ...

    ReplyDelete